Alzheimer’s The “Invisible Patients”

une is Alzheimer’s awareness month. I wanted to shed some light on the caregiver’s, loved ones and friends that are left to grieve the process of this devastating disease. Memory loss caused by Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia does not only affect the person with the disorder, it affects the entire family.
In fact, the impact on families can be so extensive that experts on the subject have referred to primary caregivers as “the second victims of Alzheimer’s” and families as “the invisible patients.”
A research-based paper co-authored by Henry Brodaty, MD, and psychologist Marika Donkin, titled “Family Caregivers of People with Dementia,” offers detailed clinical insight into the actual effects of Alzheimer’s disease on the family unit.
The publication indicates that caregivers face many obstacles as they balance caregiving with other demands, including child rearing, their careers, and relationships. They are at an increased risk for burden, stress, depression and a variety of other health complications. The effects on caregivers are diverse and complex. Numerous studies report that caring for a person with dementia is more stressful than caring for a person with a physical disability.
The effects on caregivers include:
Increased Risk of Physical Illness – Caregivers report a greater number of physical health problems than noncaregivers. Caregivers are at increased risk of various problems including cardiovascular problems, lower immunity, poor sleep patterns, slower wound healing and higher levels of chronic conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, ulcers and anemia.
Diminished Emotional Well-Being – Levels of psychological distress are significantly higher in dementia caregivers than in other types of caregivers and non-caregivers. Caregiver stress can result in serious psychological problems, including depression and anxiety that should be treated immediately.
Increasing Social Isolation – Caregivers often lack social contact and support, and, as a result, experience feelings of social isolation. Caregivers tend to sacrifice their own leisure pursuits and hobbies, reduce time with friends and family and give up or reduce employment in order to devote time to their loved one.
Growing Financial Challenges – Costs associated with caring for a loved one with Alzheimer’s disease are high. Direct costs include physician care, diagnostic tests, pharmaceuticals and personal nursing care. Indirect costs include loss of earnings by family caregivers as they
relinquish or reduce employment and paid hours out of either choice or necessity.
Quick facts:
ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE IS THE 6TH LEADINGCAUSE OF DEATH IN THE
UNITED STATES.
16.1 MILLIONAMERICANS PROVIDE UNPAID CARE FOR PEOPLE WITH ALZHEIMER’S OR OTHER DEMENTIAS.
THESE CAREGIVERS PROVIDED AN ESTIMATED 18.4 BILLION HOURS OF CARE VALUED AT OVER $323 BILLION.

The age where Alzheimer’s can start affecting a person is at the age of 30, though this is not common and reach all the way to age 90. There is a genetic test that you can get by a simple blood draw that will tell you whether you carry the gene. Now some would argue, why would I want to know? There is no cure for Alzheimer’s currently. You would have to speak to your doctor if you are at risk and develop a plan for yourself. The effects on the “invisible” patient can be devastating. Grieving the loss of a loved one when they are still here.
The most important thing to know, is you are not alone. If you’re taking care of a loved one with Alzheimer’s take time for yourself. You may want to seek counseling or join a support group. Just know you are not alone.

Woman Escapes Kidnapping While Jogging In Bridgewater [Video]

RIDGEWATER, MA – A Bridgewater man has been arrested in connection with the attempted kidnapping of a jogger Sunday morning. Police said Gordon Lyons, 57, tried to force a 37-year-old woman into his car while she jogged down Pleasant Street.

The attempted abduction happened around 7:35 a.m. Sunday morning. Video recorded by a nearby business (below at around 0:50 in the upper left corner) shows a man, who police identified as Lyons, stop his car, get out and run toward the woman. Police said he grabbed the woman’s arms and attempted to pull her toward his car. During this time, he allegedly sexually assaulted her.

The woman fought back, and she and Lyons fell to the ground, according to police. Lyons fled the area, and the jogger took of a photo of the car as it drove off.

Here at Stat Medical, our number one priority is your safety at all times.  We constantly strive to stay on top of new technology and are always working to improve our products.  We are very proud of our Wearable GPS Tracking watch and are working on some amazing new features,  our location monitoring GPS watch.

 

Source: The Patch 

Women Escapes Kidnapperhttps://patch.com/massachusetts/easton-ma/woman-escapes-kidnapping-while-jogging-bridgewater

Alexandra

In the light of the recent high-profile suicides. I thought it was a good time to bring the subject of Mental Health to this forefront. Kate Spade suicide was a surprise to me. As a young adult, it was the first designer purchase that I made. I looked up to Kate, never meeting her in person. Looked up to her as a fashion Icon, the female that went up against the “Big Boys”. She had made a name for herself, literally using her own name. When I heard the news, I had to verify that it was true. I reached out to a friend of mine Vanessa, who is involved in the marketing world and asked her if she had heard. She had confirmed the tragic news.
Knowing she had what most people would think is everything, she didn’t think she had anything at all. So, is this is what depression looks like? I am writing this article because I believe that the mental health issue in this country is a real epidemic and with much little help and support are given to those in need. Boys have a higher risk of suicide than girls. I have always been open with my boys. Yes, boys need to be able to speak and allow their feelings to be heard. Too many times I hear, “toughen up kid” No, there is no difference between depression in girls or boys. The feelings of depression are the same regardless of gender.
Hopefully this article will shed some light on the subject and broaden our thought process and get people motivated to speak about it. I see depression and anxiety everywhere. Is it the fact that we are all forced to be driven to a point where it’s too late? I see kindergarten children bringing homework that stresses out their parents, can you imagine what it’s doing to our children? We have become a drive by society. Instant gratification, no longer waiting for things. Getting upset when something isn’t given to us right away. Are we just a righteous society? Are we pushing people to their “limits” because we all have limits. Have we gone too far?
Let’s talk about depression and the signs. Rarely do people ask for help due to the stigma that still exists in 2018.

Facts About Suicide in the US

The annual age-adjusted suicide rate is 13.42 per 100,000 individuals.        
Men die by suicide 3.53x more often than women.
On average, there are 123 suicides per day.
White males accounted for 7 of 10 suicides in 2016.
Firearms account for 51% of all suicides in 2016.
The rate of suicide is highest in middle age — white men in particular.

Suicide Rates by Age

In 2016, the highest suicide rate (19.72) was among adults between 45 and 54 years of age. The second highest rate (18.98) occurred in those 85 years or older. Younger groups have had consistently lower suicide rates than middle-aged and older adults. In 2016, adolescents and young adults aged 15 to 24 had a suicide rate of 13.15.

What Is Depression?
Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression causes feelings of sadness and/or a loss of interest in activities once enjoyed. It can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems and can decrease a person’s ability to function at work and at home.
Depression symptoms can vary from mild to severe and can include:
Feeling sad or having a depressed mood
Loss of interest or pleasure in activities once enjoyed
Changes in appetite — weight loss or gain unrelated to dieting
Trouble sleeping or sleeping too much
Loss of energy or increased fatigue
Increase in purposeless physical activity (e.g., hand-wringing or pacing) or slowed movements and speech (actions observable by others)
Feeling worthless or guilty
Difficulty thinking, concentrating or making decisions
Thoughts of death or suicide
How can we help and what are the warning signs? The warning signs are below but, that doesn’t mean there is always a sign. Be vigilant.
Warning signs are indicators that a person may be in acute danger and may urgently need help.
Talking about wanting to die or to kill oneself;
Looking for a way to kill oneself;
Talking about feeling hopeless or having no purpose;
Talking about feeling trapped or being in unbearable pain;
Talking about being a burden to others;
Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs;
Acting anxious, agitated, or reckless;
Sleeping too little or too much;
Withdrawing or feeling isolated;
Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge; and
Displaying extreme mood swings.

If you see changes in your friends, loved ones talk about it. Let them know you are there for them. Let them know they are worthy. Have a suicide hotline readily available. I have a magnet that was given to my son by his college on our fridge. We as a society need to change the stigma of mental health. Our children are depending on it. Our children will turn into adults that may need help one day. Let’s teach how to ask for that help.

If you or someone you know is in crisis, call the Lifeline (USA) at 1-800-273-8255 OR Text SIGNS to741741 for 24/7, anonymous, free crisis counseling.

References:
American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), Fifth edition. 2013. www.save.org